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[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training
#1

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Has anybody here taken medical training courses like Red Cross, outdoors wilderness first aid (REI), or any military style ones (like Dark Angel Medical)? I personally did CPR training years ago and vaguely remember how to do it. Just basic training and nothing advanced like emergency dentistry. Obviously be aware of good samarathan laws in your region.

This is a practical life skill that we should learn about. If we're at the club and there's a nasty fight or mass shooting you could save somebody's life. Or if America keeps devolving prep teams may want you around as a medic.

Any recommended companies to look into?
Any online training?
Any ways of practicing since practice makes perfect?
Any recommended books?
Potential to get a job through these trainings? I.E. Ski resorts will want you to get wilderness first aid training as a prerequisite for hiring.

Thanks!

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
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#2

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

I was thinking about doing something like this also because of the mass shootings that happen occasionally. I am not in an area where it happens often but it has happened before. If I were go to Europe this would be something I would take into consideration more seriously making sure to have basic medical stuff in my backpack.

Online you can look up Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) manuals which is what the military is using for trauma care. If you were preparing for something like a mass shooting then hemorrhage control is what you would aim to achieve.

Having something like a Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) tourniquet can save your life and is what police officers and military people carry on them now and would be considered very basic if you think you might bet shot. It is basically a strap that will stop blood from going to an extremity if you were to get shot in said extremity so that you don't bleed out.

Booboo kits is different from a trauma kit and would include basic stuff like bandaids.

I should also do a refresher course on CPR because it has been so long.

There is a guy on youtube named SkinnyMedic who posts good videos. He posts gear reviews, equipment instruction videos, after action video reports, etc
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbhaasx...jpYQ6FMoKw



















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#3

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

I qualified as a first aid instructor through At Johns Ambulance when I was an instructor in the army cadet force. I still remember most of it, though the techniques may be dated.

Depending on how far you wanted to take it, there is a bodyguard training company in South Africa called Ronin(.co.za) that offers an EMT course. It's not cheap, and you would have to work in a hospital / ambulance crew to complete your 750 hours to get fully qualified.
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#4

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Do a first aid course (St Johns) somewhere nearby. Its cheap and only takes a day.

Its very useful.

This is a requirement for some jobs, and needs to be refreshed every few years.
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#5

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Thank you everybody. I will be storing this information away and will be following up [Image: smile.gif]

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#6

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Repped you Marmite. WOW! Seriously cool site. I'm considering going out to SA or Sweden to do this.

They don't just have medical courses but also a self reliance course that teaches CQC and defensive driving techniques. This is the kind of material that may come in handy if SHTF here in the States.

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#7

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

I'm on the fence about this now. Pay is nothing to brag about at about $15-20/hour, 30-40K annually but you are learning a basic life skill* that can come in handy if traveling abroad or if situations get dicey. So do Ronin course and enroll into a community course (obviously more $). It's just that I've seen the oil sands thread and the martime merchant thread (which includes room and board) and it's possible to make even more money than this.

*I don't want to go to a course just once and potentially forget everything years down the line when every minute counts, I'm on the school of thought that you have to practice repeatedly.

Just emailed the Ronin support team and this is what they said within minutes:

"You will be trained as an EMT and will have the option of then moving into a National Registry Compliant Course as a Paramedic with Crowder College in the US and then onto work in the US wherever you wish.

Your qualification will also be valid for work in the UK."

Also found this in the forum:

"I believe you have to become an EMT first, which is easy as hell. Community colleges offer the program. EMTs make like $12-14 hr. I believe they make you have a year or two experience before you can apply to paramedic school. Paramedic school is 18 months and not easy.

It depends on what you want to do. Ride around in a truck all day shuffling people to the hospital. You definitely learn some really cool stuff about patching people up, making them stable enough to get to the ER. I think the shifts are pretty cool, giving you plenty of time off.

In my opinion it's not worth it at all. The pay isn't great at all, and where do you advance to? Supervisor? No thanks. Nursing school is just a tad longer with a larger pay rate, and the sky is the limit for where you want to take your career."

thread-21580...#pid503503

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#8

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Quote: (11-07-2018 01:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Online you can look up Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) manuals which is what the military is using for trauma care. If you were preparing for something like a mass shooting then hemorrhage control is what you would aim to achieve.

This is probably the appropriate route for those that aren't looking into changing careers. Just know general principles of handling a medical kit and how to apply basic treatments. Not exactly ideal but I personally wouldn't want to spend thousands and time for a job that doesn't pay much.

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#9

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Personally vouch for these two companies.

I either was on Team, worked with, went thru a training program and/or was an instructor at these two very valuable resources...

For those that want to talk with former/current SOF men who have been in and seen both civilian and third world medical shit...

JTM in Las Vegas.

Online EMT courses, the cadre are all police or military guys. The medical advisors are OUTSTANDING in getting you what you need to know in a way that during TC3 (Tactical Combat Causality Care) type situations you'll remember protocol.

http://jtmtraining.com/


For loadout/IFAK gear; I know you can get shit anywhere...this is just a option and a great resource you can talk to and get good equipment from.
I was in service and went thru selection with the CEO. Yea, shameless plug but...he's a veteran owned and operated company and a humble dude.

https://www.chinookmed.com/?gclid=Cj0KCQ...pPqvjMaAu4
nEALw_wcB


Get trained in both shooting AND patching ppl up. Be multidimensional and knowledgeable.

FWIW
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#10

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Have you considered the fire service? You get to learn basic trauma response plus a load of other interesting and practical skills, and women love it.
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#11

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Quote: (11-08-2018 08:51 AM)ChicagoFire Wrote:  

Quote: (11-07-2018 01:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Online you can look up Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) manuals which is what the military is using for trauma care. If you were preparing for something like a mass shooting then hemorrhage control is what you would aim to achieve.

This is probably the appropriate route for those that aren't looking into changing careers. Just know general principles of handling a medical kit and how to apply basic treatments. Not exactly ideal but I personally wouldn't want to spend thousands and time for a job that doesn't pay much.

You're not being clear. Are you looking for job training to get a job or just a book and some youtube videos so you know what you are doing? What does pay have anything to do with your OP?
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#12

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Here is a link to a page where you can download PowerPoints for the Army's Tactical Combat Casualty Care
https://www.google.com/search?q=tccc+pow...e&ie=UTF-8

"Feminism is a trade union for ugly women"- Peregrine
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#13

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

There are quite a lot of options out there. Personally I would recommend something that aims to prepare you for hostile environments, as the training on these courses is pretty thorough for day to day stuff. You’re not going to be performing emergency tracheostomies with your biro, but you’ll be able to keep the blood in people, deal with everything from road traffic accidents, shootings and stabbings, to common medical conditions and the odd rarer occurrence like a snake bite.

The important thing is to try to find a course that actually simulates scenarios. It is amazing how long something simple like applying a tourniquet takes once the subject is screaming and there is blood squirting everywhere, in your face and eyes, and they are in an extremely inconvenient position, like a crushed car etc. There are some great courses run by ex soldiers, some of whom have lost limbs and who have very realistic blood squirting prosthesis, that give you a great chance to practise.

This kind of practise is essential, as under pressure the classroom learning all leaves your brain. Look for courses run by soldiers (medics, obviously) would be my advice, especially ones who have been in combat units.
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#14

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

To clarify, I was talking about how I initially wanted to go the Ronin course to community college to paramedic route. I rather just watch videos to understand my trauma kit. Sorry about the confusion. I personally am buying a trauma kit and learning how to use it. Ideally, if working as a paramedic paid more I'd do it. Making more money and practicing a vital skill is win-win. But no way I'd spend thousands and time to just make about $15 an hour. I speak for myself, if some high school kids that read this thread want to get their feet wet in the medical industry they could knock themselves out. If people want to go beyond civilian training and venture into a career then more power to them.

Just ordered my kit via the build your own trauma kit as well as a couple other skinnymedic vids:

* Orca bag
* Tourniquet
* 2 chest seals
* Combat gauze
* NPA
* Scissors
* Mylar blanket
* Duct tape
* Celox granules
* Israeli bandage
* Gloves

so about $120 off Amazon. Thanks everyone for answering, hopefully we never have to get into a situation where we have to deploy our trauma kits.

Quote: (11-08-2018 02:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Quote: (11-08-2018 08:51 AM)ChicagoFire Wrote:  

Quote: (11-07-2018 01:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Online you can look up Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) manuals which is what the military is using for trauma care. If you were preparing for something like a mass shooting then hemorrhage control is what you would aim to achieve.

This is probably the appropriate route for those that aren't looking into changing careers. Just know general principles of handling a medical kit and how to apply basic treatments. Not exactly ideal but I personally wouldn't want to spend thousands and time for a job that doesn't pay much.

You're not being clear. Are you looking for job training to get a job or just a book and some youtube videos so you know what you are doing? What does pay have anything to do with your OP?

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#15

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Watch out with Amazon, there are a lot of fake CAT tourniquets. You don't want to have the fake stuff when your life is on the line.
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#16

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

I'm not quite sure what OP is looking for, so I will just drop a few ideas.

There are many private companies that offer more "military" style EMT/CPR/First Aid type training.

See here and here for examples. It will depend on where you are located or willing to travel to.

For those in the U.S., I have a suggestion. If you live near a military base, call base operations and ask if they teach CPR/First Aid to civilians. Occasionally, they will or they will allow a civilian to participate in existing courses (this isn't as rare as you would think - Luke, Nellis, and Miramar have all done this - I heard that Coronado ran a program with LA SCUBA that taught dive medicine and allowed civilians in).

If you are looking for something that might get you hired somewhere, I would look to the companies that PMCs train with. Obviously, many of the largest contractors conduct training in-house. But, there are companies you can go to (USA, Gunsite, Academi) that will offer you combat medical training or point you to someone who will. I would contact one of them. The instructors and liasons should also be able to direct you to job openings.

If you are simply looking for some "prepper" medicine, I would check out The Patriot Nurse (Website, Youtube). She is a registered nurse with quality credentials and she is in with the US prepper movement. Her Youtube channel has some interesting stuff (fair warning, she is anti (((Liberal))) but is also anti JQ and she makes that clear in her videos- for those on the forum who care about that). She also runs some pretty hardcore courses that cover everthing from basic first aid to makeshift medical supplies (Safeway bag IVs?) to midwifery.

Currently out of office.
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#17

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Quote: (11-08-2018 09:58 PM)ChicagoFire Wrote:  

To clarify, I was talking about how I initially wanted to go the Ronin course to community college to paramedic route. I rather just watch videos to understand my trauma kit. Sorry about the confusion. I personally am buying a trauma kit and learning how to use it. Ideally, if working as a paramedic paid more I'd do it. Making more money and practicing a vital skill is win-win. But no way I'd spend thousands and time to just make about $15 an hour. I speak for myself, if some high school kids that read this thread want to get their feet wet in the medical industry they could knock themselves out. If people want to go beyond civilian training and venture into a career then more power to them.

Just ordered my kit via the build your own trauma kit as well as a couple other skinnymedic vids:

* Orca bag
* Tourniquet
* 2 chest seals
* Combat gauze
* NPA
* Scissors
* Mylar blanket
* Duct tape
* Celox granules
* Israeli bandage
* Gloves

so about $120 off Amazon. Thanks everyone for answering, hopefully we never have to get into a situation where we have to deploy our trauma kits.

Quote: (11-08-2018 02:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Quote: (11-08-2018 08:51 AM)ChicagoFire Wrote:  

Quote: (11-07-2018 01:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Online you can look up Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) manuals which is what the military is using for trauma care. If you were preparing for something like a mass shooting then hemorrhage control is what you would aim to achieve.

This is probably the appropriate route for those that aren't looking into changing careers. Just know general principles of handling a medical kit and how to apply basic treatments. Not exactly ideal but I personally wouldn't want to spend thousands and time for a job that doesn't pay much.

You're not being clear. Are you looking for job training to get a job or just a book and some youtube videos so you know what you are doing? What does pay have anything to do with your OP?

If you're going to carry all that with you, you should know how to use it, so I would strongly encourage you to take a course.

I laughed out loud, and was hugely relieve to see you aren't in the countries I live in, when I saw you are carrying an NPA, and might actually use it, on the basis that you've watched a YouTube video. I was on a combat first aid course once with a Belarusian soldier, who wanted to treat an allergic reaction to a wasp sting with a tracheostomy. The laughter that one produced was much more nervous.

You are also missing some basic stuff, like a burn shield, a splint, an indelible marker, sterile solution etc etc.

Really, if you are going to walk around with that kind of stuff, do the people you might use it on the courtesy of getting trained with every item in the pack so that you have at least a reasonable chance of using it properly in a crisis. You don't want to find yourself using celox on a stomach wound, for example, and I personally wouldn't want to bleed to death with the added indignity of having another man grope softly around my crotch looking for my artery and not finding it.
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#18

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

A few more quick thoughts:

The motivation to know some first aid is a great one. It is hugely socially valuable, and I think it's commendable. It's also a great feeling to realise that you are actually competent to help if you come across a car crash etc. The only way to reach this kind of competence though is to practise in realistic scenarios. When you touch someone and they start screaming worse, or blood starts running out of a different part of them, or they are in shock and they actually start attacking you, it is hugely disorienting. Throw in a big pile of hot, wet, smelly guts hanging out, and it can be very overwhelming (particularly if you find yourself in a situation where things are going bang around you). A lot of people think first aid is boring, but I absolutely love it. It is enormously satisfying to be competent in an important domain.

In terms of the med bag, it's a very noble idea, and a good thing to have in your car, but it isn't hugely practical to carry around with you. If you dress down usually, you can actually wear a tourniquet as a belt. If that's a bit military for you, a good canvas belt also makes a reasonable tourniquet in a pinch, as does a shemag/triangle scarf and a bit of pipe. A tourniquet and a shemag (essentially a large triangle bandage) can go a very long way in providing the kind of basic, life saving first aid that keeps someone going until the professionals arrive.
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#19

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Quote: (11-08-2018 09:58 PM)ChicagoFire Wrote:  

To clarify, I was talking about how I initially wanted to go the Ronin course to community college to paramedic route. I rather just watch videos to understand my trauma kit. Sorry about the confusion. I personally am buying a trauma kit and learning how to use it. Ideally, if working as a paramedic paid more I'd do it. Making more money and practicing a vital skill is win-win. But no way I'd spend thousands and time to just make about $15 an hour. I speak for myself, if some high school kids that read this thread want to get their feet wet in the medical industry they could knock themselves out. If people want to go beyond civilian training and venture into a career then more power to them.

Just ordered my kit via the build your own trauma kit as well as a couple other skinnymedic vids:

* Orca bag
* Tourniquet
* 2 chest seals
* Combat gauze
* NPA
* Scissors
* Mylar blanket
* Duct tape
* Celox granules
* Israeli bandage
* Gloves

so about $120 off Amazon. Thanks everyone for answering, hopefully we never have to get into a situation where we have to deploy our trauma kits.

Quote: (11-08-2018 02:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Quote: (11-08-2018 08:51 AM)ChicagoFire Wrote:  

Quote: (11-07-2018 01:26 PM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  

Online you can look up Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) manuals which is what the military is using for trauma care. If you were preparing for something like a mass shooting then hemorrhage control is what you would aim to achieve.

This is probably the appropriate route for those that aren't looking into changing careers. Just know general principles of handling a medical kit and how to apply basic treatments. Not exactly ideal but I personally wouldn't want to spend thousands and time for a job that doesn't pay much.

You're not being clear. Are you looking for job training to get a job or just a book and some youtube videos so you know what you are doing? What does pay have anything to do with your OP?

I replaced the Celox granules with Quick Clot gauze. The old stuff induced strokes, so I left it alone. And the Olaes dressing is better than the Israeli bandage (from my experience).

"Feminism is a trade union for ugly women"- Peregrine
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#20

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

I'm dedicating a year to study this but I got the basics down. It's honestly not that hard but obviously I will have to practice under simulations. I'm not planning on going to medical school for this but this is just a thread I'm posting on to bat around ideas. Hopefully there are some people here that will take initiative to learn even just basic first aid.

So yesterday I took apart my trauma kit and watched the SkinnyMedic videos.

Learned things like MARCH and SALT. So how to assess a patient, treat massive casualties, apply a tourniquet, and handle active shooter threats.

I'm still digesting the TCCC manuals.

This is on the horizon for more advanced materials.
https://courses.ccme.org/course/embootcamp (roughly $500 for the self study course).

Anybody have suggestions for practicing to keep the lessons fresh? I come from a culinary background so what I can do is pretend like a dead animal is a human and run about 50 practice scenarios to refresh my training. So for example, I'll pretend the dead pig in front of me needs CPR so I will remind myself how to apply CPR. Or it has a broken foot and I will apply xyz treatment to it.

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#21

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

This company hosts group first aid training:

http://darkangelmedical.com/direct-actio...-training/

I don't represent them or vouch for them but just throwing this group training option out there. Anybody that hosts pro-Trump rallies, preppar groups, or anything of that nature may want to get their members educated on basic life saving skills. Obviously you can use these group lessons to get vetted (non-Antifa) people to join, as in expand your group membership. Obviously if you want to progress beyond basic training (it's easy and will take 1-2 hours max to learn) there's self study programs out there that teach ER techniques.

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
Reply
#22

[Basic Life Skills] Civilian Medical Training

Just found out about this today:

Community emergency response team aka CERT

Where I live, I get free training, so can't beat that!

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations.

Quote: (09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  
For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
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